Add-on Review: g(Math) for Google Documents

In this previous post I briefly described the built-in tools that Google Docs offers for adding mathematical equations to your documents.

The g(Math) add-on, available via the Add-ons > Manage add-ons menu in your document, takes things a big step further by adding more advanced expression editing along with graph generation. If you use a lot of mathematics, this could be for you.

Click image to enlarge

Click image to enlarge

By selecting the Create math expression option from the g(Math) menu, you open a sidebar for your document. In the sidebar you’ll find an editing window for your LaTeX expressions, along with a list of pre-built expressions that you can select (by clicking on the required formula) and then editing the LaTeX code (see the previous post for a little on LaTeX).

Click image to enlarge

Click image to enlarge

At any time, you can check your progress in building the desired expression by clicking on the Preview button:

Click image to enlarge

Click image to enlarge

When you’re happy that your expression is correct, use the blue Insert button to place the expression into your document at the current cursor position:

Click image to enlarge

Click image to enlarge

In addition to expressions, g(Math) has a cool graph generator that can plot directly from expressions you enter. To use it, select Create a graph from the g(Math) menu:

Click image to enlarge

Click image to enlarge

The resulting sidebar has a similar LaTeX editor in which you can enter your experssion, and generate a plot of the equation (your equation must be of the form y = [expression] ).

Click image to enlarge

Click image to enlarge

Once more, the graph can be easily inserted into your document using the blue Insert button.

Whether you’re creating expressions or graphs, once entered into the document the size, shape and layout of the resulting image can be manipulated using Google Docs’ own layout tools:

Click image to enlarge

Click image to enlarge

The add-on is quick and easy to use, and could be a great boon for those with a lot of mathematical involvement; teachers, students, engineers, technical authors and so on.

UPDATE: Author John McGowan has now updated g(Math) to include one of the most requested features, which is the plotting of more than 1 function on the same graph. You should see the latest version in your Add-on menu:

Click image to enlarge

E Click image to enlarge

FURTHER UPDATE 7 July 2014: The author has announced that the add-on has been updated to zoom in on different regions of the graph; you can also now plot points as well as any number of functions!

This is an independent review based on personal opinion. I have no commercial or personal connection with the authors of the product reviewed.